Murder in the 11th House

Reviews

San Franscisco Book Review / Sacramento Book Review
**** (four stars out of five)

Astrologer David Lowell uses birth charts and other tools to solve cases at the Starlight Detective Agency. When his daughter, a young defense attorney representing a bartender accused of murdering a federal judge, asks for his help, he doesn’t know what he’s getting into. This case threatens not only his life, but the lives of his daughter, colleagues, and friends. Will he have the street smarts and astrological chops to solve this case? 

The mystery ties into the current political malaise that’s spawned both the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street movements, giving it a contemporary feel. The astrological analysis adds an interesting flavor to the mystery, allowing the protagonist to narrow down his list of suspects in a unique way. This book is a good choice for mystery fans looking for an offbeat read.

Library Journal 

Why not use astrology to solve cases? That's exactly what idiosyncratic detective David Lowell does so convincingly in this fun debut. A tough bartender is being framed for the murder of an up-and-coming female judge, and David's lawyer daughter has inherited her case. Already known for his astrologic expertise, David reluctantly turns his skills toward what looks like an open-and-shut case. It turns out the beautiful and perfect judge, who also had political aspirations, was not loved by everyone.

David's team digs out the seamy details, relying not just upon his battered ephemeris but astrologic databases that can pinpoint a "Mercury in retrograde" moment when a confident killer made a mistake. VERDICT Add this one to your orders. It's a perfect afternoon read that will provoke smiles. Almost cozy, with a Mr. Monk "like ensemble cast, this series debut has tremendous potential.

Publisher’s Weekly

Lewis’s winning debut, the first in a new series, introduces New York City detective David Lowell, a highly intelligent, intuitive sleuth who’s also an astrologer…Like Sherlock Holmes, the eccentric Lowell makes deductions that astound or offend those privileged to hear them. Lewis, himself a practicing astrologer, leavens the action with just the right amount of technical exposition.

© Copyright Mitchell Scott Lewis